Illustration for article titled Say What, Motherfucker? Ken Starr Hates Impeachment?
WTF?WTF?Yes. Yes, I do wish I were joking.

Milty here. Holy fuck, it’s 5:30 am and I’m already mad.

Dana Milbank has an opinion piece in the Washington Post this morning entitled “Suddenly Ken Starr doesn’t like impeachment so much.” For those who either don’t know or can’t remember who Ken Starr is, he’s the reason Bill Clinton got impeached for a blowjob. I’m spitting mad (get it?) already so I am just going to copypasta the rest:

“It just seems we need to ratchet the conversation down because of the evils of impeachment,” the former independent counsel said during an interview with conservative writer Byron York released on Monday. “Impeachment has become a terrible, terrible thorn in the side of the American democracy and the conduct of American government since Watergate. . . . Let’s at least have a reasoned and deliberate conversation about some lesser kind of response.”

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Excuse me? A blowjob, motherfucker...did you forget? A BLOWJOB!

Starr thinks Congress should consider censuring President Trump, and he says Republicans in 1998 should have considered “whether something short of impeachment would be appropriate.”

Now he tells us? He didn’t mention “censure” once in his referral to Congress in 1998 laying out “substantial and credible information that President Clinton committed acts that may constitute grounds for an impeachment,” nor in his November 1998 testimony. Then, Starr argued passionately that Clinton’s actions fit the “high-crime-and-misdemeanor” standard.

Starr wasn’t finished. During this week’s interview, he also absolved Trump of guilt, both for obstruction of justice in the Mueller inquiry and for wrongdoing in the Ukraine quid pro quo, saying Trump’s “intent” was pure. Starr protested that Trump “is being held to a remarkable standard” in which we are “over-criminalizing the conduct of the business of government.”

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Did irony just die and no one informed me?

“Republicans were, in fact, proceeding in good faith and with a very substantial basis because the president was — and virtually everyone agreed with this — guilty of very serious offenses against the rule of law, particularly perjury and obstruction of justice,” said Starr, moments after dismissing the Mueller report’s evidence of Trump’s obstruction of justice.

“Everyone with reason accepted the proposition that Bill Clinton committed crimes,” he added. “There I don’t think will ever come a point where all persons of good faith agree, let’s call it a consensus, that [Trump] stepped across the line.”

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Pardon me while I scream in the void.

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